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School Supports Positive Behaviour

How is it defined?

Schools and teachers are responsible for academic instruction, as well the task of stimulating students’ social, emotional, and moral development (Greenberg et al., 2003). Effective behaviour management is necessary to achieve positive and productive classrooms (Lewis, Romi, Katz, & Qui, 2008).

The Learning Bar’s Parent Survey is based on a framework developed by Joyce Epstein designed to foster positive relations between school and community (Epstein et al., 2002). The survey covers parents’ perceptions of their children’s experiences at home and school, as well as the extent to which parents feel the school supports learning and positive behaviour and promotes a safe and inclusive environment.

Why is it important?

  • The social development of students and reduction of behaviours that interfere with learning are both critical aspects of schooling (Greenberg et al., 2003).  
  • Effective classroom management practices acknowledge appropriate behaviours and respond to inappropriate ones (Simonsen, Fairbanks, Briesch, Myers, & Sugai, 2008).
  • Rules carry meaning for all students and help create order and give structure to class lessons (Boostrom, 1991).

How do we measure it?

In Tell Them From Me, parents respond on a five-point scale which is scored as follows: 0 (Strongly Disagree), 1 (Disagree), 2 (Neither Agree nor Disagree), 3 (Agree), and 4 (Strongly Agree). The data are scaled on a 10-point scale and the results are reported as ‘the average score for school supports positive behaviour’.

 

References

Boostrom, R. (1991). The nature and functions of classroom rules. Curriculum Inquiry, 21(2), 193- 216.

Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2002). School, family, and community partnerships: Your handbook for action (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Greenberg, M. T., Weissberg, R. P., O'Brien, M. U., Zins, J. E., Fredericks, L., Resnik, H., & Elias, M. J. (2003). Enhancing school-based prevention and youth development through coordinated social, emotional, and academic learning. American Psychologist, 58(6-7), 466-474.

Lewis, R., Romi, S., Katz, Y. J., & Qui, X. (2008). Students’ reaction to classroom discipline in Australia, Israel, and China. Teaching and Teacher Education, 24(3), 715-724.

Simonsen, B., Fairbanks, S., Briesch, A., Myers, D., & Sugai, G. (2008). Evidence-based practices in classroom management: Considerations for research to practice. Education and Treatment of Children, 31(3), 351-380.